Rival Designs

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choice36c:

Larry Davis Shot Six Cops in self defense. 
If Twitter existed back in the 80’s, everyone would’ve been on the edge of their seats, frantically tweeting about Larry Davis the way they did about Christopher Dorner. On November 19th, 1986 Davis shot and injured six New York City police officers during a raid on his sister’s apartment in the Bronx. After blasting his way out with a shotgun and .45 caliber pistol (literally blowing one cop’s jaw off the hinges), Davis somehow evaded an army of cops and disappeared into the night. Despite a massive manhunt that rivaled the search for Dorner, Larry Davis was on the lam for 17 days before being captured.Davis was no angel, he was straight-up gangster. He was the main suspect in the execution-style killings of four drug dealers in the Bronx and also allegedly caught three other bodies around town. Police claimed the raid on Davis was to question him about the murder. However, Davis would later reveal in court that the raid was nothing more than a front… a staged attempt to kill him because he knew too much about corrupt cops in the drug game. Davis maintained that he was recruited into a crack ring by rogue police officers. Suburban white folks, far removed from the ghetto, scoffed at the notion. But inner-city people of color had no problem believing Davis because we all know how dirty cops get down.With a litany of charges stacked against him, including weapons possession and attempted murder of police, prosecutors were unable to convince a jury of Larry Davis’ guilt for any but the weapons charge, finally getting a conviction over four years after the shootout. But only a fool believed the swine would let Davis off that easy.The NYPD promised Larry he wouldn’t be harmed once he turned himself in but their word was worth Confederate money. Once in custody Davis suffered serious beatings at the hands of vengeful authorities, eventually leaving him wheelchair-bound. They made his life Hell every chance they got. Then on February 20th 2008, Larry Davis was stabbed to death by a fellow inmate in a prison yard brawl. The authorities shrugged it off as an accident but I never believed that bullshit. The swine were out to get Larry Davis one way or the other and on that fateful day at Shawangunk Correctional Facility, they finally assassinated him. But even before his death, Davis was already solidified as a folk hero in hoods across the country… a respected urban legend of the highest degree.Count me among the masses glued to the television, cheering for Larry Davis while he was on the run. See, I don’t have fond childhood memories of friendly police officers helping to get my cat out of a tree. I have memories of a police-issued Glock pressed against the back of my dome when I posed no threat. Memories of being stopped & frisked for the umpteenth time, forced to bite my tongue or bite a bullet. Friends of mine were unjustly beaten and killed by pigs who were never punished for crossing the line. Confrontations with racist, trigger-happy police are a right of passage where we’re from. Maybe I’ll write a novel about my negative experiences with cops but for now, there’s not enough time to list them all.So I guess people will now debate over who’s greater between Davis or Dorner, the way we debate over Jordan and LeBron. When Larry Davis did his thing, there were no social networks to broadcast his exploits to the world in real-time like Dorner. But Larry did manage to evade the cops for a longer period of time and as my friend pointed out, he didn’t kill any innocent people. Dorner may score extra points with his admirers because he actually killed an officer. Allegedly he killed another cop during the cabin shootout but as reckless as the LAPD shoots, that murder may be attributed to “friendly fire.” Dorner’s story is still unfolding; the authorities still haven’t confirmed his death. Both men are legendary in their own way but personally, I give Larry Davis the nod.

Never forget.

choice36c:

Larry Davis Shot Six Cops in self defense. 

If Twitter existed back in the 80’s, everyone would’ve been on the edge of their seats, frantically tweeting about Larry Davis the way they did about Christopher Dorner. On November 19th, 1986 Davis shot and injured six New York City police officers during a raid on his sister’s apartment in the Bronx. After blasting his way out with a shotgun and .45 caliber pistol (literally blowing one cop’s jaw off the hinges), Davis somehow evaded an army of cops and disappeared into the night. Despite a massive manhunt that rivaled the search for Dorner, Larry Davis was on the lam for 17 days before being captured.

Davis was no angel, he was straight-up gangster. He was the main suspect in the execution-style killings of four drug dealers in the Bronx and also allegedly caught three other bodies around town. Police claimed the raid on Davis was to question him about the murder. However, Davis would later reveal in court that the raid was nothing more than a front… a staged attempt to kill him because he knew too much about corrupt cops in the drug game. Davis maintained that he was recruited into a crack ring by rogue police officers. Suburban white folks, far removed from the ghetto, scoffed at the notion. But inner-city people of color had no problem believing Davis because we all know how dirty cops get down.
With a litany of charges stacked against him, including weapons possession and attempted murder of police, prosecutors were unable to convince a jury of Larry Davis’ guilt for any but the weapons charge, finally getting a conviction over four years after the shootout. But only a fool believed the swine would let Davis off that easy.

The NYPD promised Larry he wouldn’t be harmed once he turned himself in but their word was worth Confederate money. Once in custody Davis suffered serious beatings at the hands of vengeful authorities, eventually leaving him wheelchair-bound. They made his life Hell every chance they got. Then on February 20th 2008, Larry Davis was stabbed to death by a fellow inmate in a prison yard brawl. The authorities shrugged it off as an accident but I never believed that bullshit. The swine were out to get Larry Davis one way or the other and on that fateful day at Shawangunk Correctional Facility, they finally assassinated him. But even before his death, Davis was already solidified as a folk hero in hoods across the country… a respected urban legend of the highest degree.
Count me among the masses glued to the television, cheering for Larry Davis while he was on the run. See, I don’t have fond childhood memories of friendly police officers helping to get my cat out of a tree. I have memories of a police-issued Glock pressed against the back of my dome when I posed no threat. Memories of being stopped & frisked for the umpteenth time, forced to bite my tongue or bite a bullet. Friends of mine were unjustly beaten and killed by pigs who were never punished for crossing the line. Confrontations with racist, trigger-happy police are a right of passage where we’re from. Maybe I’ll write a novel about my negative experiences with cops but for now, there’s not enough time to list them all.

So I guess people will now debate over who’s greater between Davis or Dorner, the way we debate over Jordan and LeBron. When Larry Davis did his thing, there were no social networks to broadcast his exploits to the world in real-time like Dorner. But Larry did manage to evade the cops for a longer period of time and as my friend pointed out, he didn’t kill any innocent people. Dorner may score extra points with his admirers because he actually killed an officer. Allegedly he killed another cop during the cabin shootout but as reckless as the LAPD shoots, that murder may be attributed to “friendly fire.” Dorner’s story is still unfolding; the authorities still haven’t confirmed his death. Both men are legendary in their own way but personally, I give Larry Davis the nod.

Never forget.

lumumbabandele:

The short story, courtesy of the film’s website, goes… Larry Davis was a New Yorker who shot six New York City police officers on November 19, 1986, when they raided his sister’s Bronx apartment. The police said that the raid was executed in order to question Davis about the killing of four suspected drug dealers. At trial, Davis’s defense attorneys claimed that the raid was staged to murder him because of his knowledge of the involvement of corrupt police in the drug business. With the help of family contacts and street friends, he eluded capture for the next 17 days despite a massive manhunt. Davis eventually surrendered to police, and was acquitted of attempted murder charges in the police shootout case, and was acquitted of murder charges in the case involving the slain drug dealers. He was found guilty of weapons possession in the shootout case, acquitted in another murder case and was found guilty in a later murder case and was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison.

In 2008, Davis was stabbed to death in a fight with another inmate.

The Larry Davis case generated controversy. Many were outraged by his actions and acquittal, but others regarded him as a folk hero for his ability to elude capture in the massive manhunt, for so many years, or as the embodiment of a community’s frustration with the police, or as “a symbol of resistance” because “he fought back at a time when African-Americans were being killed by white police officers.

Based on that true story, The Larry Davis Project gives insight into the motivations of a Bronx youth in the 1980s. At a time of police corruption, drug proliferation and rampant poverty, a young Larry Davis struggled with who he would become - thug or artist?

The feature film, which comes from Epoch Motion Pictures, is scheduled to debut sometime this year.

Check out a sneak:

Too bad Larry was one of a kind.

(Source: blogs.indiewire.com)

darvinasafo:

Interesting.

Too bad Larry was one of a kind.

darvinasafo:

Interesting.

Too bad Larry was one of a kind.

lovtheladies:

wzrdtalk:

quickweaves:

guccimaneuver:

britteryikes:

This is terrifying.

this is so fucking disgusting smh

My god I have never seen something so terrifying in my entire life

real live just made me cry wow, literally terrible.

And people wonder why we don’t trust the police??  This is just another example of what’s been going on for DECADES in this country now….

Fucking pigs








THIS WILL BE SUCH A LONG MARATHON AND I AM SO READY

That’s prob about 12 hours

extended lotr alone is 11 hours and 22 minutes.

LOTR Extended = 681 minutesHobbit 1 Extended = 182 minutesHobbit 2 Extended = approx. 186 minutesLet’s say Hobbit 3 Extended is at least 185 minutes
The full marathon run time will be around 1234 minutes, or 20 hours 30 minutes.

#perfect that leaves 3 and a half hours for snack runs and pee breaks

let’s weed out the weak ones

my body is ready

THIS WILL BE SUCH A LONG MARATHON AND I AM SO READY

That’s prob about 12 hours

extended lotr alone is 11 hours and 22 minutes.

LOTR Extended = 681 minutes
Hobbit 1 Extended = 182 minutes
Hobbit 2 Extended = approx. 186 minutes
Let’s say Hobbit 3 Extended is at least 185 minutes

The full marathon run time will be around 1234 minutes, or 20 hours 30 minutes.

let’s weed out the weak ones

my body is ready

(Source: mindtriggers, via wadewilson4president)

artsyravenclawwitch:

mc-squidward:

doragray:

jennlferlawrence:

frostingpeetaswounds:

i laughed so hard at the “i don’t know” and “something is wrong”

the twilight one is like abstract poetry

If you read it all together it’s like the most awkward, tense conversation ever.
"My name is Katniss Everdeen," I sighed. Nothing happened.
"I don’t know," he sighed.
Harry looked around, I shake my head and shrugged.
Harry stared. “I am seventeen years old.”
I frowned and he waited.
"My home is District 12."
Harry chuckled and said nothing. Now I wish I had.
I laughed. We looked at each other. I swallowed hard. He shrugged. Harry blinked and hesitates. I flinched.
He looked around. “I’m not really surprised.”
I took a deep breath, something he didn’t have last time. “Something is wrong.”
He didn’t answer. He stood up.

OMG

I CAN’T BREATHE

artsyravenclawwitch:

mc-squidward:

doragray:

jennlferlawrence:

frostingpeetaswounds:

i laughed so hard at the “i don’t know” and “something is wrong”

the twilight one is like abstract poetry

If you read it all together it’s like the most awkward, tense conversation ever.

"My name is Katniss Everdeen," I sighed. Nothing happened.

"I don’t know," he sighed.

Harry looked around, I shake my head and shrugged.

Harry stared. “I am seventeen years old.”

I frowned and he waited.

"My home is District 12."

Harry chuckled and said nothing. Now I wish I had.

I laughed. We looked at each other. I swallowed hard. He shrugged. Harry blinked and hesitates. I flinched.

He looked around. “I’m not really surprised.”

I took a deep breath, something he didn’t have last time. “Something is wrong.”

He didn’t answer. He stood up.

OMG

I CAN’T BREATHE

(via lovtheladies)